After 5 months, there are no worms in my compost pile, should I buy some e.g worm farm ones?

I also have cockroaches - I have tried to add garden lime but it doesn't seem to work - should I just keep adding?

Asked by Jenny Ball

5 answers

  • Dig up your lawn, preferably in a moist area. Hopefully, you will find the worms existing in the soil. Transfer a few to your compost bin.

    Answered by Narain keswaniRating: 0
  • Dear Jenny,

    Lauren has provided a very complete answer and I agree with her - you don't need worms to get good compost. I've been going 2 years with my bins and have only seen worms once!

    Regarding the roaches: I get them sometimes too. Adding water (or actually spraying inside the bin with the hose) has worked for me.

    Answered by Chris TisdellRating: 0
  • Hi Jenny, was your compost bin an Aerobin?, If it is they won't get worms naturally as it is not directly on the ground. They work slightly differently adn you don' tactually need worms in it. You can add them though and they will suvive and help, try to get a handful or so from a friend with worms and see how they go. If your bin is a normal one on the ground maybe the soil where you have the bin is particularly bad or is contaminated with something that kills worms? Maybe you coudl move it to somewhere that looks healthy and organic, but the soil where you have it should improve and start getting worms unless there is a problem.

    Try to keep mixing it and stirring it up to disturb the cocokroaches. they may be nesting in a bit that's not moving around much or breaking down.

    Answered by Lauren Michener (staff) Rating: 0
  • Hi Jenny, have a look into your compost and turn it with a garden fork or copost turner and decide if the conditions at the moment are providing a good habitat for worms.

    If it is too dry the worms won't be able to get in populate it. As as Chris & Lauren have indicated it might be that your local soil may have a depleted compost worm population. If that is the case then you will either have to be patient or add the worms as you asked. If the conditions you introduce them to aren't favourable they will take off to moister places with soft squishy food to eat.

    I suggest give it some more time and focus on doing everything right and consider putting an old potato or coffee sack over the compost in the bin and wet it down to help keep the humidity up.

    If you continue to have no luck email me and I will deliver some worms and castings to you and help to give your compost bin a servicing to get it really going and producing quality compost for your garden.

    Answered by Cameron LittleRating: 0
  • Where do you get a coffee sack ? It's my first time composting.

    Answered by carmen molinaRating: 0

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