We have big problems with cockroaches in our compost ! Does anyone know how best to control this ?

Asked by Emma Schofield

Green Beret

4 answers

  • Hi Emma,
    You don't have a cockroach problem, you have a chook deficiency :-)
    Grab a chook or two, lift the lid and watch nature at work turning cockies into eggs.
    When the show's over, add moisture and stir (the compost that is). When you get it just right the compost will get hot enough to hard boil the eggs!! Gotta love permaculture!!

    Answered by Steve Batley
    Green Beret
    Rating: 0
  • Hi Emma,

    A big soak with a hose and a big stir with a compost stirrer or pitchfork will shake them. If you use an Aerobin, remove the aeration tube in the centre, and rely on stirring to aerate your bin rather than the tube. The lime/dolomite/wood-ash will also help. Unless your compost smells tangy and acidic, use less than a table spoon.

    Different critters indicate different conditions in compost. Cockroaches like warm, dry, undisturbed places. Warm, means your compost is working :) Dry means there are at least patches that are too dry and providing nesting sites (maybe thick unstirred through leaf layers?) . The aeration tubes in Aerobins are know to provide a dry nest site, right in the centre of warm, food rich compost. Cockroach heaven! Undisturbed means the compost isn't being stirred enough. So no matter what model composter you have, be sure to give it a reasonable stir every time you add material. Cover up with brown/carbon materials, to be stirred in next time. :)

    Answered by JP Williamson
    Green Beret
    Rating: 0
  • Use our industrial level electronic cockroach trap, you can kill hundreds cockroach in a week! check ebay to get one!

    Answered by Charles LuoRating: 0
  • I would think that there are too many yummy snacks for them. The compost is not cooking and your food scraps are not breaking down fast enough. Adding some lime, dolomite or wood ash could help balance the compost. Also turning the pile can help to get it cooking. I also use a large amount of coffee grounds in our community garden compost - not sure if it is the caffeine or the heat that they don't like... Where possible move your compost to a sunny spot and improve the biodiversity in your yard so that other critters like lizards and frogs can eat them ;)

    Answered by David Winterton
    Green Beret
    Rating: 0

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