What's the point of 100% biodegradable nappies when they go in the rubbish which goes to landfill?

Asked by Stephanie

3 answers

  • Even in landfill any biodegradable things "biodegrade" - as long as there is moisture and oxygen. And that itself is much better as they don't add toxic substances to our soil and groundwater.
    Re/cloth nappies: Great alternative. However, if you don't have outdoor/sun space to dry them you might end up with much more nappies than what's recommend.

    Answered by Harald Grabner
    Green Beret
    Rating: 1
  • Hi Stephanie,
    Just to clarify, a landfill environment is anaerobic (oxygen deprived). Waste in landfill therefore isn't subjected to the same degrading process as waste in compost. Even paper can take hundreds of years to break down in landfill, compared to a few weeks in the compost.

    Different councils take their waste to different facilities, so it is good to find out from your local council where the waste goes which may guide your purchasing decisions. For example, cornstarch and biodegradable cups cannot be recycled as normal plastic cups because they are not made of plastic. So, if you were planning to recycle the cups, plastic would be the better choice, but if you wanted to compost the cups, you would opt for biodegradable.

    Answered by Guada Lado
    Green Beret
    Rating: 0
  • Hi Stephanie,

    Ideally biodegradable nappies would be sent to a commercial composting facility, but even if you don't have access to this service then they can still be a more sustainable choice. This is because they are manufactured from materials such as bamboo or natural plant fibres, which require fewer resources to create than petroleum based plastics.

    Reusable cloth nappies have been shown to be the greenest option, assuming they are washed in cold water in a front loader and then line dried.

    Answered by Eleanor Raftery
    Green Beret
    Rating: 0

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